Leland Street Cooperative Garden

Join Us at: 15 Leland Street
Jamaica Plain, MA 02130

What is the Leland Street Cooperative Garden?

The Leland Street Cooperative Garden is a community garden in the truest sense of the term. Dedicated to creating a neighborhood gathering place, the garden is free from individually owned plots and fences, locks and keys. Everything in the garden is open for all to use.

We have many events at and about the garden.

If you wish to receive email about garden events, contact:

lelandgardeninfo@gmail.com
Leland Street Co-operative Garden
15 Leland Street
Jamaica Plain, MA 02130
What is the garden?

The garden is an oasis offering shade trees and a place to sit, walk, and enjoy. There are monthly steering committee meetings and workdays for those who wish to participate. We have a cutting flower garden, vegetable beds, perennial borders, and, as the centerpiece, a lovely herb garden. We also have honeybees. Composting is done using a three-bin system.

Origin and evolution of the garden:

By the early 1980’s, an area of 11,445 square feet, comprising three vacant lots, had become a dumping ground, littered with broken glass, garbage, and abandoned cars. It had also become a venue for drinking, drug dealing, and other illegal activity; most neighbors avoided walking into or even near The Lots. At that time, some nearby neighbors of The Lots decided to address the problem. They began to organize cleanup days and picnics, and discussed possible uses for the space.

In 1983, Boston Natural Areas Fund purchased the lots, ensuring that they would remain “green and open to the public forever.” In 1989, the garden received a grant of $25,000 from the Grassroots Program of the City of Boston. A local landscape architect was hired to design the garden, with input from neighbors. It was decided to build an open community space rather than individual plots.

Many neighborhood volunteers worked for two years to re-grade, haul in quality soil, and plant herbs, shrubs, and trees. In 1991, The Leland Street Community received the prestigious Community Garden of the Year award from the Massachusetts Horticultural Society.

From 1991 until the present, the garden has been sustained by work days and monthly meetings, bringing joy to neighbors and contributing to our sense of community.Recently, ownership of the land comprising the Leland Street Cooperative Garden has passed from Boston Natural Areas Network (now defunct) to Trustees of Reservations. Interested members of the community are exploring exciting ways of responding to this change. A recent name change, from the Leland Street Community Garden to the Leland Street Cooperative Garden, was made for the sake of clarity and to avoid confusion, since, unlike the vast majority of “community gardens,” the Leland Street Community garden does not have any individual plots.

As always, everyone who wants to get involved in the garden and its ongoing process of change, adaptation, and evolution as a resource for the community and a means of creating community is welcome!

For Events and Gatherings just subscribe to our newsletter at lelandgardeninfo@gmail.com

Below is a sample list of the variety of herbs, vegetables, fruits and flowers we grow each year:

Herbs:
Basil – July through September
Chives – June through November
Comfrey – June through September
Dill – July through September
Fennel – June through September
Lavender – June through September
Lemon balm – April through September
Lovage – April through May
Mint – April through September
Oregano – June through September
Parsley – July through September
Sage – June through October
Sorrel – April through November
Vegetables:
a variety of green leafy vegetables in season
Broccoli
Tomatos & Tomatillos
Beans
Peas
Unions & Garlic
Pepers
Rhubarb
Asparagus
Fruits:
Strawberries
Raspberries
Gooseberries
Jostberries
Juneberries
Elderberries
Grapes
Flowers:
a profusion of perennials such as roses, bee-balm, and butterfly bushes
a cutting garden with annuals including zinnias and cosmos

Future Endeavors:
– Planting (remediation, native species, soil regeneration)
– Water Harvesting (rain barrels)
– Artistic Earth Construction Projects (cob workshop – benches, oven)
– Community/Cultural Events (music, films…)
– Youth Programs/Activities (food/environmental justice, job training, creative cooperation…)